Academic Science Standards Support

The Bakken’s Batteries Workshop supports the following Minnesota Academic Standards in Science.

CODE

BENCHMARK

4.1.2.2.1

Identify and investigate a design solution and describe how it was used to solve an everyday problem.

4.1.3.3.1

Describe a situation in which one invention led to other inventions.

4.2.3.2.2

Construct a simple electrical circuit using wires, batteries and light bulbs.

5.1.1.1.1

Explain why evidence, clear communication, accurate record keeping, replication by others, and openness to scrutiny are an essential part of doing science.

5.1.1.1.2

Recognize that when scientific investigations are replicated they generally produce the same results, and when results differ significantly, it is important to investigate what may have caused such differences.

5.1.1.1.3

Understand that different explanations for the same observations usually lead to making more observations and trying to resolve the differences.

5.1.3.4.1

Use appropriate tools and techniques in gathering, analyzing and interpreting data.

 

The Bakken’s Static Electricity Workshop supports the following Minnesota Academic Standards in Science

CODE

BENCHMARK

3.1.1.1.1

Provide evidence to support claims other than saying “Everyone knows that,” or “I just know,” and question such reasons when given by others.

3.1.1.2.1

Generate questions that can be answered when scientific knowledge is combined with knowledge gained from one’s own observations or investigations.

3.1.1.2.2

Recognize that when a science investigation is done the way it was done before, even in a different place, a similar result is expected.

3.1.1.2.4

Construct reasonable explanations based on evidence collected from observations or experiments.

3.1.3.2.1

Understand that everybody can use evidence to learn about the natural world, identify patterns in nature, and develop tools.

3.1.3.2.2

Recognize that the practice of science and/or engineering involves many different kinds of work and engages men and women of all ages and backgrounds.

4.1.2.2.1

Identify and investigate a design solution and describe how it was used to solve an everyday problem.

4.1.3.3.1

Describe a situation in which one invention led to other inventions.

4.2.3.1.3

Compare materials that are conductors and insulators of heat and/or electricity.

5.1.1.1.1

Explain why evidence, clear communication, accurate record keeping, replication by others, and openness to scrutiny are an essential part of doing science.

5.1.1.1.2

Recognize that when scientific investigations are replicated they generally produce the same results, and when results differ significantly, it is important to investigate what may have caused such differences.

5.1.1.1.3

Understand that different explanations for the same observations usually lead to making more observations and trying to resolve the differences.

5.1.3.4.1

Use appropriate tools and techniques in gathering, analyzing and interpreting data.

 

The Bakken’s Magnet & Electromagnets Workshop supports the following Minnesota Academic Standards in Science

CODE

BENCHMARK

3.1.1.1.1

Provide evidence to support claims other than saying “Everyone knows that,” or “I just know,” and question such reasons when given by others.

3.1.1.2.1

Generate questions that can be answered when scientific knowledge is combined with knowledge gained from one’s own observations or investigations.

3.1.1.2.2

Recognize that when scientific investigation is done the way it was done before, even in a different place, a similar result is expected.

3.1.1.2.4

Construct reasonable explanations based on evidence collected from observations or experiments.

3.1.3.2.1

Understand that everybody can use evidence to learn about the natural world, identify patterns in nature, and develop tools.

3.1.3.2.2

Recognize that the practice of science/engineering involves many different kinds of work and engages men and women of all ages and backgrounds.

4.1.2.1.1

Describe the positive and negative impacts that the designed world has on the natural world as more and more engineered products and services are created and used.

4.1.2.2.1

Identify and investigate a design solution and describe how it was used to solve an everyday problem.

4.1.3.3.1

Describe a situation in which one invention led to other inventions.

4.2.3.1.2

Describe how magnets can repel or attract each other and how they attract certain metal objects.

4.2.3.2.3

Demonstrate how an electric current can produce a magnetic force.

5.1.1.1.1

Explain why evidence, clear communication, accurate record keeping, replication by others, and openness to scrutiny are an essential part of doing science.

5.1.1.1.2

Recognize that when scientific investigations are replicated they generally produce the same results, and when results differ significantly, it is important to investigate what may have caused such differences.

5.1.1.1.3

Understand that different explanations for the same observations usually lead to making more observations and trying to resolve the differences.

5.1.3.4.1

Use appropriate tools and techniques in gathering, analyzing and interpreting data.

6.1.2.1.1

Identify a common engineered system and evaluate its impact on the daily life of humans.

6.2.2.2.3

Recognize that some forces between objects act when the objects are in direct contact and others, such as magnetic, electrical and gravitational forces can act from a distance.

 

The Bakken’s Introduction to Magnets Workshop supports the following Minnesota Academic Standards in Science

CODE

BENCHMARK

0.1.1.2.1

Use observations to develop an accurate description of a natural phenomenon and compare one’s observations and descriptions with those of others.

1.1.1.1.1

When asked “How do you know?,” students support their answer with observations.

1.1.1.1.2

Recognize that describing things as accurately as possible is important in science because it enables people to compare their observations with those of others.

2.1.1.2.1

Raise questions about the natural world and seek answers by making careful observations, noting what happens when you interact with an object, and sharing the answers with others.

2.2.1.1.1

Describe objects in terms of color, size, shape, weight, texture, flexibility, strength and the types of materials in the object.

2.2.2.2.1

Describe how push and pull forces can make objects move.

 

The Bakken’s Guided Exhibit Tours support the following Minnesota Academic Standards in Science

CODE

BENCHMARK

0.1.1.2.1

Use observations to develop an accurate description of a natural phenomenon and compare one’s observations and descriptions with those of others.

1.1.1.1.1

When asked “How do you know?,” students support their answer with observations.

1.1.1.1.2

Recognize that describing things as accurately as possible is important in science because it enables people to compare their observations with those of others.

1.1.3.1.1

Observe that many living and nonliving things are made of parts and that if a part is missing or broken, they may not function properly.

1.1.3.2.1

Recognize that tools are used by people, including scientists and engineers, to gather information and solve problems.

2.1.1.2.1

Raise questions about the natural world and seek answers by making careful observations, noting what happens when you interact with an object, and sharing the answers with others.

2.1.2.2.3

Explain how engineered or designed items from everyday life benefit people.

2.2.1.1.1

Describe objects in terms of color, size, shape, weight, texture, flexibility, strength and the types of materials in the object.

3.1.1.1.1

Provide evidence to support claims other than saying “Everyone knows that,” or “I just know,” and question such reasons when given by others.

3.1.1.2.1

Generate questions that can be answered when scientific knowledge is combined with knowledge gained from one’s own observations or investigations.

3.1.1.2.4

Construct reasonable explanations based on evidence collected from observations or experiments.

3.1.3.2.1

Understand that everybody can use evidence to learn about the natural world, identify patterns in nature, and develop tools.

3.1.3.2.2

Recognize that the practice of science and/or engineering involves many different kinds of work and engages men and women of all ages and backgrounds.

4.1.2.1.1

Describe the positive and negative impacts that the designed world has on the natural world as more and more engineered products and services are created and used.

4.1.2.2.1

Identify and investigate a design solution and describe how it was used to solve an everyday problem.

4.1.2.2.2

Generate ideas and possible constraints for solving a problem through engineering design.

4.1.3.3.1

Describe a situation in which one invention led to other inventions.

4.2.3.1.3

Compare materials that are conductors and insulators of heat and/or electricity.

4.2.3.2.2

Construct a simple electrical circuit using wires, batteries and light bulbs.

5.1.1.1.3

Understand that different explanations for the same observations usually lead to making more observations and trying to resolve the differences.

5.3.4.1.1

Identify renewable and non-renewable energy and material resources that are found in Minnesota and describe how they are used.

5.3.4.1.3

Compare the impact of individual decisions on natural systems.

6.1.2.1.1

Identify a common engineered system and evaluate its impact on the daily life of humans.

6.1.2.1.2

Recognize that there is no perfect design and that new technologies have consequences that may increase some risks and decrease others.

6.1.2.1.4

Explain the importance of learning from past failures, in order to inform future designs of similar products or systems.
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